The world is looking forward to 2020, for many reasons, and the main one for traders and buyers is definitely the Expo 2020. This time happening in Dubai, and hence will become the most popular World Fair since its inception, the new logo was unveiled by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai.

The main theme of Expo 2020 is “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future” with the sub-themes being Sustainability, Mobility and Opportunity. The logo of Expo 2020 is inspired from a simple gold ring that was dug out from Saroug Al Hadeed, an archaeological site discovered by His Highness, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.

With artefacts dating back to the Iron Age – from discoveries that belongs to Egyptian Pharaoh, Thutmose III, cedar wood from Lebanon to objects from modern day India and Afghanistan – it was clear that the place was a place to gather and connect, where people and ideas met to create something astonishing.

People are using technology in new and exciting ways. For example, to teach students hundreds of miles away, unable to receive anything more than a basic education. New ideas open up new possibilities.

THE LOGO:

expologo (1)THE ENERGY OF HUMAN CONNECTIONS
There is a link between each part of the ring, representing the power of connections that remain over time and distance.

THE CELEBRATION OF INGENUITY
An exquisite ring found in Saroug Al Hadeed is the inspiration behind the logo. Fashioned with utmost care by the skilled craftsmen of the past, this ring is a celebration and reminder of Expo’s role as a global point of intersection today.

THE SPUR OF PROGRESS
A timeless effort for continuous improvement and advancement, the ring reminds us that ingenuity and innovation remain one of the most enduring characteristics shared by humanity.

 

 

Sheikh Mohammed said the logo “represents our message to the world that our civilization has deep roots. We were and will always be a pot that gathers civilizations and a centre for innovation. Over 4,000 years ago, the people who lived in this land had a deep creative spirit and today the people of this country are building the nation’s future for centuries to come.”

 

Reference: www.expo2020dubai.ae

Rebranding is when you need a whole new branded look to your already established brand. But there are a lot of companies that messed up their brands-either with their logos or their concepts. Here are 4 of the lot:
Syfy-Rebrand-Before-and-After

From Science Fiction to Syfy. Maybe the SciFi Channel should have checked out UrbanDictionary before it released its new name. In most parts of the world, “syfy” is a slang term for syphilis. The company’s main justification for this name-change was that, while they couldn’t trademark the term “SciFi”, they could own the less-researched, alternate spelling.

 

Tropicana-Rebrand-Before-and-After

Silly PepsiCo! All it was trying to do was bring its classic Tropicana OJ into the 21st century.
When it rolled out its new package in January 2009, its customers understood that the brand had underestimated how attached they were to the old package designs. The backlash was immediate and powerful. The New York Times reports that “Some of those commenting described the new packaging as “ugly” or “stupid,” and resembling “a generic bargain brand” or a “store brand.””
Kraft-Rebrand-Before-and-After

Kraft are one of the biggest food and drinks companies in the world. When they revealed their new brand identity in 2009, the design community went crazy and eventually, the food giant relented and six months later, pretty much reverted to their original concept.
They used Tekton as one of their fonts. A font used in the same breath as Comic Sans and Papyrus. A dreadful decision. And the rest of the logo? It’s just so bland and generic for such a renowned company, it’s pathetic. The original logo was like a smack in the face with one of their plastic cheese squares. It said “BOOM! WE ARE KRAFT” whereas the new logo says “We’re a food and drinks giant without any true identity, we’re quite bland and very generic, we’re Kraft-ish.”

 

Pepsi-Rebrand-Before-and-AfterPepsi is no stranger to logo redesigns. But the company reportedly spent $1 million on their latest reincarnation, and it turned out like… this, the one on the right side.
The white strip on the new logo varies across Pepsi products, getting wider or thinner depending on product. The design team that spearheaded the campaign explains that they’re supposed to be “smiles”, but we don’t really see it.
As this clever graphic from The Consumerist shows, the Pepsi logo seems to have been redone nearly once a decade over the last century — while Coke‘s iconic logo has barely been touched. It’s not hard to see which is the better strategy here.

 

 

Reference : BusinessInsider

“A brand is worthless if it doesn’t connect with the right audience in a relevant way.”

In a fast-paced world, where consumer choices, demands and favourites change overnight, businesses often comes off bad. It’s unrealistic for an organisation to believe that the perfect mix of products, systems, infrastructure and workforce is at the top of its game.

Brand identity is integral, akin to a signature. It is unique, personal and identifiable, and a positive brand image works wonders for business. The decision to rebrand however is a big one – it is not just changing your brand logo and designs. Rebranding, if done skilfully, is a massive win for any company. A well-thought out, strategic brand strategy focuses on the positives and eliminates the negatives.

Thinking about rebranding? Do you need to? Here are some key points to consider:

  • Take a step back and evaluate. Is your brand doing all you want it to do? As the saying goes, ‘If it aint broke, don’t fix it.’ But if it is, know exactly what parts of the mix are flawless, and what isn’t working the way it should.
  • Assess the playing field. Know your competition. Establish their strengths and weaknesses and relate them against your own.
  • Know yourself. What can you do better? Try everything possible when it comes to giving yourself that extra boost to set you at the forefront of the competition.
  • Customer. Customer. Customer. You know your customer? Look again. Pay close attention to consumer behaviour and find out if you’re really giving them what they want.

The big decision. Rebranding is more than just a change in logo and tagline. It’s about telling your brand story the way it was meant to be told, so that everyone listening, never forgets.

Successful rebranding takes your business up a ladder that previously didn’t exist, giving your brand the foundation to evolve and flourish, whilst reinforcing your core business strategy, values and image.

It’s a conscious choice to stay relevant, revive growth and build loyalty. It may not be easy, but it will definitely be worth it.

 

Reference : James Pass Design

Ever since Medium first launched in beta three years ago, it has sported a logo that is simple, elegant, and strong, big, bold, black-and-white slab-serif M, from the font Stag.

Whyletz

It served them well through their first few years, but as Medium has grown and evolved, the logo has begun to feel flat, impenetrable, blunt, and not to be toyed with. It is also not particularly distinctive, either. In short, it no longer captured or conveyed what Medium has become.

They set out to create a logo that was a better reflection of who they were and came up with a million different ideas for a new M icon. & they were on to something! This simple geometric interpretation of the M felt fun — like a delightful game or a deeply satisfying puzzle.

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Whyletz

 

Lastly, after much design philosophizing as to whether the logo should be rendered in perspective, isometric, or axonometric projection (they went for isometric), they created a exhaustive range of different heights and angles to make sure we landed on the most steady and most optically pleasing form.

Whyletz

 

And finally, the result:

Whyletz

 

Reference: Medium

Asana has got a new look, and that’s what they had been working on for the past several months. Teams across the globe in every industry—from fast-growing tech companies like Pinterest and Uber, to organizations like the United Way and NASA, to global brands like Disney and Verizon—use Asana to achieve more than they could before. There’s more opportunity to make work even easier for you. So, after countless customer conversations, user experience studies, and prototypes, they built a new Asana.

Before

2.-before


After
3.-after

Asana is a powerful product with a lot of features, and in the old Asana it could feel overwhelming to get started with your team. To fix that, the product needed some big changes. In fact, the number one request from customers was an improved design. The new Asana is redesigned to make tracking work to completion easier, so teams can get on board quickly and use Asana to achieve their goals. Asana is on a mission to help you and your team do great things together. By making it easy to keep track of your work, we give you more time to do the work that matters: building software, curing patients, cooking meals, or whatever it is your company does.

4.-Brand-Attributes-1024x1004

 

 

Asana’s new logo

 

logo_horiz1

logo_metrics-1024x551three_dots_metrics-1024x484

Asana’s 3 dots used to patiently wait in line at the deli counter, but now they’re working together on a common goal. Instead of a cool green, they’re now an empowering, warm coral, with a glow that conveys the active energy between the team. The letter forms, placement, and arrangement of our logo were crafted with purpose. If you look closely, you’ll notice that there are three dots equally spaced inside the “A” letters in our word mark.

The new Asana is the easiest way to track work, and get results.

Reference : Asana

Read directly from Google official blog:
 
Google has changed a lot over the past 17 years—from the range of our products to the evolution of their look and feel. And today we’re changing things up once again:

 

So why are we doing this now? Once upon a time, Google was one destination that you reached from one device: a desktop PC. These days, people interact with Google products across many different platforms, apps and devices—sometimes all in a single day. You expect Google to help you whenever and wherever you need it, whether it’s on your mobile phone, TV, watch, the dashboard in your car, and yes, even a desktop!

Today we’re introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens. As you’ll see, we’ve taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).

It doesn’t simply tell you that you’re using Google, but also shows you how Google is working for you. For example, new elements like a colorful Google mic help you identify and interact with Google whether you’re talking, tapping or typing. Meanwhile, we’re bidding adieu to the little blue “g” icon and replacing it with a four-color “G” that matches the logo.

This isn’t the first time we’ve changed our look and it probably won’t be the last, but we think today’s update is a great reflection of all the ways Google works for you across Search, Maps, Gmail, Chrome and many others. We think we’ve taken the best of Google (simple, uncluttered, colorful, friendly), and recast it not just for the Google of today, but for the Google of the future.

Source: Google Official Blog

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